The Baltimore Sun Now Reporting – Ebola virus in humans may be here to stay – LA Times and Chicago Tribune

ebola1LA Times and Chicago Tribune:

In a grim assessment of the Ebola epidemic, researchers say the deadly virus threatens to become endemic to West Africa instead of eventually disappearing from humans.

“The current epidemiologic outlook is bleak,” wrote a panel of more than 60 World Health Organization experts in a study published Tuesday by the New England Journal of Medicine.

“We must therefore face the possibility that Ebola virus disease will become endemic among the human population of West Africa, a prospect that has never previously been contemplated.”

In the absence of new control measures, the authors estimated that the total case load would exceed 20,000 by Nov 2.

“The numbers of cases of and deaths from EVD are expected to continue increasing from hundreds to thousands per week in the coming months,” the authors wrote.

As of Monday, the United Nations health organization reported that out of a total of 5,864 confirmed and probable cases, 2,811 deaths have resulted.

“The true numbers of cases and deaths are certainly higher,” the authors wrote. “There are numerous reports of symptomatic persons evading diagnosis and treatment, of laboratory diagnoses that have not been included in national databases, and of persons with suspected Ebola virus disease who were buried without a diagnosis having been made.”

When a virus is slow to mutate, as Ebola appears to be, the pathogen steadily wanes as the number of people who have developed immunity increases. With proper controls, experts say the virus would find it increasingly difficult to spread among the population until it eventually disappeared from humans and survived only in its so-called animal reservoir, which is believed to be a fruit bat.

In this case however, epidemiologists fear that the virus could continue to linger in small pockets, extending its life in humans and potentially mutating in a way that makes fighting it more difficult.

In an accompanying editorial, Dr. Jeremy Farrar, director of the Wellcome Trust, and Dr. Peter Piot, director of the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, said the epidemic has helped to degrade an already meager system of healthcare.

This “disintegration” would have broad consequences and “only worsen as the epidemic progresses,” they wrote.

“West Africa will see much more suffering and many more deaths during childbirth and from malaria, tuberculosis, HIV-AIDS, enteric and respiratory illnesses, diabetes, cancer, cardiovascular disease, and mental health during and after the Ebola epidemic.”

Farrar and Piot also warned that here was “a very real danger of a complete breakdown in civic society.”

In the WHO paper, researchers presented their first, full statistical snapshot of the epidemic, which gained a foothold in December of last year and has fallen hardest on Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone.

The majority of patients stricken by Ebola are 15 to 44 years old, with men and women suffering at a nearly equal rates, according to researchers. The case fatality rate — based on confirmed cases only — is 70.8%, with a slightly lower chance of death — 64.3% — for those admitted to a hospital.

Although the epidemic has already killed more people than all previous outbreaks combined, researchers said the virus now wreaking havoc on some of the world’s poorest nations is no more lethal or virulent than other strains.

Instead, its rapid spread is due to “insufficient” control efforts, and a “large intermixing” population that has transported the virus across borders and between rural and urban areas.

In order to stop the epidemic, researchers say the rate of transmission would have to be cut in half. This would be equivalent to vaccinating 50% of the population.

Several experimental vaccines are under development, and — if they prove to be effective — won’t be available in large quantities for months.

Several of those experimental Ebola drugs, including compounds from Mapp Biopharmaceutical, Sarepta and Tekmira, will be tested in West Africa for the first time in a bid to fast-track trials, the Wellcome Trust charity said on Tuesday.

Announcing a $5.25 million grant for the work, the global health charity said the money would “enable multiple partners around the world to quickly establish clinical trials at existing Ebola treatment centers”.

“It is a huge challenge to carry out clinical trials under such difficult conditions, but ultimately this is the only way we will ever find out whether any new Ebola treatments actually work,” said Jeremy Farrar, the Wellcome Trust’s director.

“What’s more, rapid trials, followed by large-scale manufacturing and distribution of any effective treatments, might produce medicines that could be used in this epidemic.”

The Wellcome Trust said several potential drugs are under consideration and a group of independent experts appointed by WHO is working to recommend which to prioritize based on factors such as which is likely to work best, their availability, the ability to give them safely, and whether they can be manufactured to a useful scale.

Study authors made the following observations on the effects of the outbreak.

  • The average age of a person infected with Ebola is 32, and 49.9% of patients are male, researchers said. The age group that has been most affected by the virus makes up 44% of the total population.
  • The most common symptoms reported by patients included fever (87.1%), fatigue (76.4%), loss of appetite (64.5%), vomiting (67.6%), diarrhea (65.6%), headache (53.4%), and abdominal pain (44.3%).
  • Although the disease is infamously known for causing bleeding, “specific hemorrhagic symptoms were rarely reported (in less than 1% to 5.7% of patients),” authors wrote. “Unexplained bleeding” however was reported in 18% of cases.
  • People age 45 or older faced a significantly greater threat of death, as did those who suffered a number of the following symptoms: diarrhea, conjunctivitis, difficulty breathing or swallowing, confusion or disorientation and coma, unexplained bleeding, bleeding gums, bloody nose, bleeding at injection sites and bleeding from the vagina.

“The risk of continued epidemic expansion and the prospect of endemic EVD in West Africa call for the most forceful implementation of present control measures and the rapid development and deployment of new drugs and vaccines,” the authors concluded.

Los Angeles Times and Reuters contributed.

Read more: http://www.chicagotribune.com/lifestyles/health/chi-ebola-virus-20140923,0,6812432.story#ixzz3E8ii3rwE

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Refugee Settlement Watch – Even John Kerry States We Must Fight The EBOLA Breakout – Kerry uses the words “climate refugees,” says the problem is on par with ISIS and Ebola

Posted by Ann Corcoran on September 23, 2014

Watch for it!  This is going to be one more excuse for the West to be pressured into opening the flood gates to the third world. Or, to at least send gazillion dollars down rat holes.

We’ve been telling you in our “climate refugees” category about the behind-the-scenes scuffling over using the word “refugees” for people who are moving around due to global warming (or perceived global warming).

The humanitarians are not thrilled that the environmentalists are tapping into the good image they have built up over the warm and fuzzy word—refugee.  (That image is crumbling now anyway because of increased attention to not only the demands “refugees” put on “welcoming” countries, but to the downright lies that go on with those driving the refugee agenda.)  The Left is always manipulating the language!

Here is Secretary of State John Kerry in advance of the UN meeting which opens today, and where Obama is going to try to change the subject from Islamic terrorists to the threat of global warming (climate change now that they know we really aren’t warming).

From The Hill:

Secretary of State John Kerry said the threats posed by climate change should be addressed with as much “immediacy” as confronting the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS), and the Ebola outbreak.

During a meeting with foreign ministers on Sunday, Kerry said global warming is creating “climate refugees.”

http://refugeeresettlementwatch.wordpress.com/2014/09/23/kerry-uses-the-words-climate-refugees-says-the-problem-is-on-par-with-isis-and-ebola/

johnkerry

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Be sure to sign-up for Help Save Maryland News Letters at:
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Immigration Reform Examiner – Threat: Ever heard of ‘Mexican Ebola?

By Dave Gibson

virus1

U.S. health officials refuse to admit the link between the recent surge of illegal alien children over our Southern border, and the expanding epidemic of Enterovirus (DV-68), which is landing children in emergency rooms across the country. However, considering that between 2009-2013 there were only 79 reported cases of DV-68, compared to the hundreds of such cases reported in the last few weeks…it is not difficult to draw a link between tens of thousands of recently-arrived children distributed around the country with no real health checks and this very frightening disease, apparently now making its way through our public schools.

But, there may be an even more chilling threat lurking out there…

One of the diseases common throughout Mexico and Central America is dengue fever, which is a virus spread victim-to-victim through the bites of female mosquitoes. Dengue fever causes flu-like symptoms in both children and adults, but does not ordinarily cause death.

However, the virus can develop into a much more severe illness known as dengue hemorrhagic fever, which like Ebola, causes massive internal bleeding and organ failure.

The illness initially causes small spots of blood (petechiae) to appear on the patient’s skin, followed by larger patches of blood (ecchymoses) to appear under the skin. After those rather gory symptoms present themselves, the patient slips into a state of shock, which is followed by death in half of these patients.

The National Library of Medicine lists the following symptoms for dengue hemorrhagic fever:

Early symptoms include:

-Decreased appetite
-Fever
-Headache
-Joint or muscle aches
-Malaise
-Vomiting

Acute phase symptoms include:

Restlessness followed by:
-Ecchymosis
-Generalized rash
-Petechiae
-Worsening of earlier symptoms
Shock-like state
-Cold, clammy extremities
-Sweating

Why should we be worried about this disease, which some in the American Southwest refer to as ‘Mexican Ebola?’

-In 2013 alone, 2.35 million cases of dengue fever were reported across the Americas (with only a few cases seen as far North as Florida and Texas), of which 37, 687 cases developed into dengue hemorrhagic fever, according to the World Health Organization.

-Those younger than 12 years of age, females and Caucasians are more at risk for contracting dengue hemorrhagic fever.

-As stated earlier, unlike those who come to this country legally, the tens of thousands who came here illegally in the past few months, received little to no health checks before being sent to live with their relatives (already here illegally) across the U.S., and many could have easily been infected before leaving or while making the trip to this country atop freight trains.

-Because it is a virus, there is no treatment for dengue, other than providing relief for some of the symptoms.

It is important to remember, that flu-like symptoms were widely reported at Border Patrol stations and detention centers, and unlike the adults, as a matter of policy, the government is not allowed to detain children who come here illegally for more than three days, before placing them in a home (The incubation period for dengue is 4–10 days after being bitten by an infected mosquito.).

All it takes is the bite from one mosquito, after it has bitten an infected human.

Incidentally, on Sept. 20, it was reported that the Army Corps of Engineers would begin spraying for mosquitoes in Hampton Roads, Va…It should also be noted that this type of mosquito control usually takes place during the Spring and Summer in this region.

Do they know something?

http://www.examiner.com/article/threat-ever-heard-of-mexican-ebola

Be sure to sign-up for Help Save Maryland News Letters at:
newsletters@helpsavemaryland.org and or, Subscribe through the
website. Be sure to follow Help Save Maryland on Twitter, https://twitter.com/helpsavemd @HelpSaveMd and our Facebook Page if your a member: https://www.facebook.com/HelpSaveMaryland

How can you help in the fight against illegal immigration?
Please consider a tax-deductible donation to Help Save Maryland
to support our education and outreach activities.

Click the donate button to use a credit card or mail your check
to: Help Save Maryland, PO Box 5742, Rockville, MD 20855. Thank
you!

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